Tag Archives: m/m

Review: The Courtland Chronicles (EC Author, Non EC Book)

When I was twenty years old, I fell in love with a girl. I was both surprised and not at all surprised by this development. After six months of dancing around the subject, which drove our mutual friends utterly insane, we ended up together. Which was when I found out that she hadn’t come out to her parents yet, despite the fact that she’d identified as either bisexual or as a lesbian since she was in junior high, and had multiple girlfriends in high school and college before me.

Maybe this is why I sympathize with Eric more than Nick in the early novels of The Courtland Chronicles by Cat Grant. According to Cat, Eric fans have been few and far between over the years.

CourtlandIn the early days of the EC fuss that has dominated Romland for the past few weeks, Cat Grant went public, asking readers not to buy the series she’d published with EC. I got in touch with her to express my sympathies, saying that I didn’t want the free copies she was offering of the Icon Men series, but that I’d love a recommendation to another, non-EC series that I could purchase, to support her that way. We discussed some of what she had out, and she suggested this, for the sweet MMF that develops in the later books.

I enjoyed the Courtland books, without doubt. I love Eric, in all his brokenness, which tells me something about Grant’s writing ability; I have joked before that I have a fetish for broken boys, but Eric really should have made me madder. In fact, as things went on, it was Nick that I lost patience with. Always hiding from his parents, always expecting Eric to give him a little longer, and be okay with waiting. Maybe it’s because I’ve been there, or because times are just different from when this book was originally published, but I was very cranky with Nick, no matter how gorgeous his equipment might have been.

The later books see Eric and Nick establishing a relationship with their friend Ally, and creating a stable poly relationship, which is delightful and wonderful. The story of discrimination they face is mentioned, but never dwelled on, and the smutty bits are excellently smutty.

I understand Grant is now working on sequels that will focus on the Courtlands’ kids? I’m excited to read them!

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Review: A Case of Possession by K J Charles

Earlier this year, a friend lent me The Magpie Lord, a great historical paranormal by London author K. J. Charles. I loved everything about the book, but for some reason, it took me until now to pick up A Case of Possession. There will be spoilers for the first book below, but they should be minor.

a-case-of-possession

Lord Crane has never had a lover quite as elusive as Stephen Day. True, Stephen’s job as justiciar requires secrecy, but the magician’s disappearing act bothers Crane more than it should. When a blackmailer threatens to expose their illicit relationship, Crane knows a smart man would hop the first ship bound for China. But something unexpectedly stops him. His heart.

Stephen has problems of his own. As he investigates a plague of giant rats sweeping London, his sudden increase in power, boosted by his blood-and-sex bond with Crane, is rousing suspicion that he’s turned warlock. With all eyes watching him, the threat of exposure grows. Stephen could lose his friends, his job and his liberty over his relationship with Crane. He’s not sure if he can take that risk much longer. And Crane isn’t sure if he can ask him to.

The rats are closing in, and something has to give…

There are so many things to love about Charles’ Charm of Magpies series. The effortless capture of the British class society. The way Lucien is given an actual reason to not care about it. The rocking women. Esther Gold, introduced here as Stephen’s justiciar partner, is fantastic. The way Lucien and Stephen’s romance continues to develop, without taking the focus off the actual paranormal storyline. The smutty, delicious sex. Oh, the sex. Ahem.

Writing a story with romantic elements that isn’t actually a romance (I define the difference as which plotline is given the most “screentime” or importance in the story, other definitions might vary) is trickier than your average writing student might think. Too many authors focus too heavily on one or the other, leaving the more minor storyline to feel as tacked on as it usually in. Charles keeps them in perfect balance throughout the book. It matters that Stephen and Lucien are lovers, their dynamic matters, and both drives the action and is driven by it.

I adored this book, and as soon as I’d finished it, I pre-ordered the third book, Flight of Magpies, due out October 28th. I can’t wait.